Read Aloud Bible Stories: Volume One written by Ella K. Lindvall and illustrated by H. Kent Puckett was published by Moody Publishers (1982). There are many books of retold Bible stories for children, but this one takes first prize. Its text is fast-paced and kid-friendly. Through repetition it emphasizes the emotions of the people involved. Young children will be swept up in the story as if they were actually there.

The stories in this first volume are: “The Man Who Was Too Little,” “The Man Who Couldn’t See,” “The Boys and Girls and Jesus,” “The Wind That Obeyed” and “The Man Who Said Thank You.”

At the end of each story is the question, “What did you learn?” The answer given further relates the story to the child and what he or she needs to understand about himself and God. For example in “The Man Who Couldn’t See,” the answer is Jesus took care of His friend and He will take care of you.

The colorful, yet simple illustrations do more than enhance the text. They capture the excitement and adventure of each story. For example, the fear on each disciple’s face during the storm makes the story seem even more real. The children can almost hear Jesus command the wind and the waves to be still.

This book has been recognized with two awards: a Gold Medallion Book Award and a C. S. Lewis Medal Honor Book.

There are four other volumes which are just as delightful and true to God’s Word.

Carol Green, a graduate of Northwestern, is a widow and the mother of three adult children. Her five grandchildren affectionately call her “Grams cracker.” She is the published author of many poems for both adults and children; three coloring books: God Gave Me Five, ABC Fun Book, and Color God’s World Bright; and the picture book: My Mom Loves Me.

George Washington Carver: From Slave to Scientist was written by Janet and Geoff Benge and published by YWAM Publishing (2001). This man’s life is truly extraordinary. Many books have been written about George Washington Carver. I recommend this one because of the smooth flow of the story connecting the many remarkable events of Carver’s life. The reader gets a strong sense of his personality, faith, and the motivations that carried him through difficult times. Part of the Heroes of History series, it is a great candidate for a book report, but it is also a fascinating read in its own right.

George’s mother was bought as a slave by the Carvers, a childless couple on a farm in Missouri. Bushwhackers—lawless men who stole slaves and resold them—carried off baby George and his mother one night. Although a search was made, only George was found. He and his brother Jim grew up on the farm, learning hard work and frugality. The end of the Civil War brought freedom to all slaves. Jim was happy to stay and work on the farm, but George was restless. Mrs. Carver taught him to read, but there were few books for him to explore. George took long walks and became fascinated with plants. After seeing paintings at a neighboring farm, George created inks and made pictures of his own.

When he was eleven, George packed up his meager belongings, said goodbye to Jim and the Carvers, and walked eight miles to the nearest town to go to school. Taken in by a kind couple, he helped them wash clothes for townspeople in exchange for room and board. Soon he had learned everything the teacher knew, and he moved on to another school, working his way.

George’s youth was a series of these moves across the country, as he sought knowledge. He met wonderful mentors and friends, as well as atrociously bigoted people who threatened his life. His genius, a growing resume of skills, perseverance, and work ethic are impressive. The obstacles put in his path by evil people were huge and some passages are heart wrenching to read.

Eventually, George Washington Carver earned both Bachelor of Science and Master’s degrees. Later in life he was awarded an honorary doctoral degree. He served for four decades as head of the agricultural department at Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute in Macon County, Alabama. This all African-American school was set up by Booker T. Washington to equip former slaves to earn a living. George’s work there encompassed laboratory research, teaching classes, nature hikes, leading a Bible study, beautifying the grounds, educating local farmers on how to increase crop yields and creating astonishing new uses for peanuts and soy beans.

Over the course of his life, George Washington Carver became friends with James Wilson (United States Secretary of Agriculture, 1897-1913), President Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, and many other influential people of the day. Although he could have used his tremendous skills to enrich himself, George Washington Carver dedicated his life to lifting up those in greatest need.

I recommend this book for high school because the subject matter is complex, and there are violent scenes. Carver’s life will intrigue people contemplating college and career directions. It can be purchased on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Christianbook.com in paperback and audiobook.

Donna Fujimoto’s children love to read. She is a graduate of Alliance Theological Seminary. Her collection of short stories, 9 Slightly Strange Stories with an Uplifting Edge  is available as an e-book at Amazon.  The Shining Orb of Volney, a science-fiction novel, is her latest title. 

They Didn’t Use Their Heads was written and illustrated by Jo Ann Stover and published by JourneyForth (1990).

Attention parents, grandparents and teachers. This whimsical and clever book will captivate both the child and adult reader with its words of wisdom.

It suggests playfully many ways to use your head such as turning it, laying it down or covering it up. In a humorous way it shows what happens when you don’t use your head. However, if you are wise and a tiny bit clever, it offers, you can think with your head before you act.

The author takes familiar squabbles and difficulties that come from a child’s not thinking and then comes up with reasonable solutions. The solutions are understandable to any child such as, “you can be right without a fight,” or  “even when you’re small you can help.”

This book could lead to great discussions of other ways a brother and sister didn’t use their heads and what the results might be, as well as the remedies.

Repetition of the phrase, “They didn’t use their heads,” and the use of rhyme act as stepping stones drawing the listener into the book. The author’s decision to use of a variety of children’s names prompts the child reader to listen for his/her own name which contributes to making the book a page turner.

In this world of bright colors and “bling,” the book’s simple black- and-white illustrations add to the sound, sensible flavor of the writing and are anything but boring. The facial expressions go hand-in-hand with the text of the story.

I definitely give They Didn’t Use Their Heads high marks and recommend it for children ages five to eight.

Carol Green, a graduate of Northwestern, is a widow and the mother of three adult children. Her five grandchildren affectionately call her “Grams cracker.” She is the published author of many poems for both adults and children; three coloring books: God Gave Me Five, ABC Fun Book, and Color God’s World Bright; and the picture book: My Mom Loves Me.

Harriet Beamer Strikes Gold, written by Joyce Magnin and published by Zondervan (2013) will keep you in stitches! The main character is a hoot. Harriet Beamer is a spunky lady in her early seventies who travels across the country with her donut-loving basset hound, Humphrey, to live with her only son, Henry and his wife Prudence.

Adventure follows Harriet, but at the moment she is feeling homesick and missing her best friend Martha. Martha also has an only son, but though she raised him well, he made some wrong choices. He is now in prison for armed robbery. She has handed the entire situation over to the Lord, and He has granted her peace in the midst of her heartbreak. Harriet also knows the Lord, but she tends to jump to her own ways and solutions when it comes to some of her choices. Harriet convinces Martha to come and visit her.

Henry, a stay-at-home writer, and Prudence, a busy lawyer, have several surprises for the-newly-arrived Harriet. The first one being that they will soon be adding a suite for Harriet onto their small house. She is thrilled as she learns she will now be able to unpack her beloved salt-and-pepper shaker collection. The second surprise is that after two miscarriages, Prudence is expecting again and Harriet will finally be a grandma!

Henry encourages his mom to get out into the town, make some new friends and engage in her hobbies. Harriet hits it off with a neighbor, and together they visit the Empire Gold Mine. Harriet is fascinated with the mine and wonders what it would be like to own or rent a gold mine herself.

Within the week, Harriet is dining at the cafe in town where she one day meets a seventeen-year-old named Lily. She feels sorry for the girl who seems lonely and appears to be in need. Her mother died quite a while ago and she lives with her father, Winslow G. Jump, or Win for short.

He soon shows up at the cafe and Harriet feels he is lacking in his parenting of Lily.In the course of conversation, Harriet learns that Win desperately needs a backer for a mine he will be leasing from a man named Old Man Crickets. The mine is a placer mine about forty-five minutes away.

If Harriet would agree to be a backer, her name would be on the lease and she might soon just come into lots of money. Harriet is intrigued. Before she knows it, she has volunteered to be the needed backer, handing over about five thousand dollars to Win.

Harriet, Win and Lily visit the mine, and then agree to stay in touch. She is promised paperwork giving her details about her newly leased mine. She decides not to tell her son and his wife about her investment, thinking they have enough to deal with.

In a few days, Harriet’s friend Martha arrives for a visit and Harriet spills the beans about the mine. Within the week, she has handed over even more money to Win and still has none of the promised paperwork. Martha worries about this situation and even though she has promised not to tell Harriet’s son, she tells him one day when Harriet is out. She asks him not to tell his mother where he found out.

Without divulging the outcome of the story, I’ll just say that in a very clever way, and with a moral to the story, all turns out happily. Harriet learns a valuable lesson about prayer, and her friend Martha finds the hope of a possible new start for herself.

All the characters in this story are adorable, but especially Harriet with her quirky ways and Converse sneakers. I’m sure you will fall in love with her and enjoy her adventures as I did.

Patsy Ledbetter says she has many titles, but her favorite is being mom to her five children. Her two daughters, two sons and one son-in-law are her joy. A teacher with forty years experience Patsy has taught children of all ages and also special needs children and adults. She writes occasionally for a local newspaper and performs in church theater productions on a regular basis. Her husband is the church choir and orchestra director. They have been married for 32 years. She says, “It is my desire to bring honor and glory to my Lord Jesus in every area where He has allowed me to minister.”

 

William Wilberforce: Take up the Fight (Heroes of History) was written by Janet & Geoff Benge and published by Emerald Books (2015).

William Wilberforce lived a remarkable life. Born into a wealthy merchant’s family, he had many advantages as a child, but tragedy sent him off to an aunt and uncle’s house for a number of years. There he was given a Bible and nurtured in the Christian faith.

After returning home, William steadily lost touch with his faith and lived a life of materialism: partying, singing, drinking, betting on cards, and avoiding his studies.

A visit to Parliament introduced William to his calling–politics– and to William Pitt, who became a dear friend and partner in the British government. The two young men pursued their careers together. At twenty-one, William Wilberforce became the youngest man ever elected to Parliament. William Pitt did not join him until later, but rose to become Prime Minister by the age of twenty-four.

Through reading and debate, William Wilberforce’s mind and heart turned back to Christianity. Could he be a Christian and a politician at the same time? He wrote to William Pitt, explaining that he thought he should resign from the government. He secretly met with his mentor, John Newton, to seek his advice. Both Pitt and Newton encouraged Wilberforce to remain in politics. Thrilled and terrified, William Wilberforce decided to display publicly what God might do through a man determined to follow Him.

Wilberforce sought to translate his faith into bills that would benefit society and eradicate its many evils. He debated long and hard, but often his bills were rejected. He also used his fortune to support education for poor children, more humane prisons, kinder treatment for animals, better public manners and polite speech, and many other causes.

Slowly, Wilberforce met people who educated him on the evils of the slave trade, including Thomas Clarkson, James Ramsay, Sir Charles Middleton, and others. He realized this was a great cause that he must champion. For years it seemed that William introduced a new anti-slave bill each spring, only to have it voted down. He tried many different strategies to end this human trafficking, but it was hard to sway the wealthy men who derived so much income from the labor of their own slaves. Public opinion sometimes went his way, sometimes against him. His health suffered, but he pushed on.

Read how William’s efforts finally brought about the demise of this great evil, how God blessed his life through an unexpected marriage, and how God upheld William even through loss and trouble.

The life of William Wilberforce is an important story for children to read. This biography is suited for upper elementary, middle school, and high school audiences. Although the subject matter—slavery—is harsh, the writers deal with it skillfully. They make the evils abundantly clear without graphic description. There is a lot of talk about war and politics that can be a little confusing. This was a very dynamic era in British history. The language level is appropriate and the story length is about 200 pages. You can buy it on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

Donna Fujimoto’s children love to read. She is a graduate of Alliance Theological Seminary. Her collection of short stories, 9 Slightly Strange Stories with an Uplifting Edge  is available as an e-book at Amazon.  The Shining Orb of Volney, a science-fiction novel, is her latest title. 

 

From the Start written by Melissa Tagg and published by Bethany House Publishers (2015) is Book 1 of 2 in the Walker Family Series. It is a delightful read for women age 18 and above. The writing is funny, positive and cheerful, even though not everything that happens is upbeat.

Kate Walker, the main character, is in her twenties. She used to believe in romance until she gave her heart to Gil, a married man who lied about his marital status in order to win her affection. Now she is recovering from that experience.

Kate writes made-for-TV screenplays. When she is told a TV network is turning down her screenplays, she puts it all in perspective. Several years ago she had won an Emmy for her writing, but she knows lately her scripts have been lacking something. She considers moving home to Maple Valley, Iowa.

Not far into the story, we are introduced to Colton Greene, a former NFL quarterback who has been forced into early retirement due to a shoulder injury. His best friend is Kate’s brother, Logan Walker. Logan takes Colton home to Maple Valley with him to help his father repair a train depot damaged in a recent tornado. Colton’s manager, knowing Colton can’t play professional football, keeps urging him to find a writer to write his story. Colton is dragging his feet on this suggestion.

In Maple Valley, Colton meets Kate Walker unexpectedly when she lands at home late at night, goes to her room and finds him in her bed! She is shocked and quickly moves to another room. The next day, all is figured out and forgiven. Colton and Kate begin talking.

While living in LA, Colton was very depressed and discouraged after he was forced to give up sports. Also the girl he was recently seeing became engaged to somebody else.Colton finds himself loving small-town Maple Valley and its slower pace. He throws himself into helping Logan’s father prepare the train depot for Depot Day in early October. Kate admires Colton’s qualities of self-sacrifice and hard work. They both begin to think about God and how He might have a purpose in all of the changing events of their lives.

Colton asks Kate to write his story. She agrees and has completed several chapters when she discovers Colton’s parents died when he was nine, and he was in foster care until the age of eighteen. He did have a wonderful caseworker who loved the Lord. He still has many scars from the tragedy in his young life and Kate has trouble getting him to talk about his past.

From the Start is about a romance but it also looks at love between family members and between friends. Webster Hawks, a teenage boy in foster care, is on the football team. He becomes friends with Colton and Colton mentors him. Kate meets Megan, a single, twenty-one-year-old who owns the coffee shop in town and who discovers she is pregnant. Both Kate and Colton become the big brother and sister that these young people never had.

Things are going smoothly when a surprising twist comes about. Just as everyone is gathered for Depot Day to celebrate the newly renovated train station, there is a flood. Every one pitches in and helps with sand bags. Colton and Kate end up at Megan’s house because the bridge has been shut down for the night. That evening Colton takes Kate on a special date. He receives permission from a realtor to take her to a vacant home in town that she has always admired from a distance, but has never visited. They have a picnic and even see a movie.

On the way home, they argue. Colton is having second thoughts about a book being written about him. He has escaped the limelight and doesn’t want to be in it again. Kate doesn’t agree. Writing the book was going to help her and she had her heart set on it.  She wants to go back to Megan’s place, but he thinks they should talk. Colton keeps driving, and a deer runs across the road. Another vehicle hits their car. Colton’s knee is injured; Kate has broken some bones and is rushed to the hospital. He stays by her side.

Colton tells her family what has happened. They are forgiving, but he is convinced Kate won’t want anything to do with him. He feels responsible for her injuries and for disappointing her about the book. He decides to leave town and return to LA for awhile. Kate is very hurt that he has left without saying goodbye, but she understands how bad he must feel so she waits on the Lord to discover His plan. After Kate recovers, she returns to Chicago.

The story continues to twist and turn but it ends happily. The two of them discover a new faith, a ministry, and a lasting relationship with each other.

I enjoyed reading all the details in this story. It definitely kept my attention, and as always, kept me up at night. I learned that God’s plans for us are often very different from our own. In the end, His plans are better and more wonderful than anything we could think or imagine.  He uses all the joy and hardships to mold us into the vessels he wants us to be for His glory.

Patsy Ledbetter says she has many titles, but her favorite is being mom to her five children. Her two daughters, two sons and one son-in-law are her joy. A teacher with forty years experience Patsy has taught children of all ages and also special needs children and adults. She writes occasionally for a local newspaper and performs in church theater productions on a regular basis. Her husband is the church choir and orchestra director. They have been married for 32 years. She says, “It is my desire to bring honor and glory to my Lord Jesus in every area where He has allowed me to minister.”

OXYGEN by John B. Olson and Randall Ingermanson is a science fiction novel about a mission to Mars. The story immerses the reader in the world of NASA, the lives of its astronauts, and space travel. Portraying scientific detail realistically, but understandably for those who aren’t science geeks, it is an informative yet highly entertaining read.

The story shifts between three points of view.  Valkerie Jansen is an MD, who hopes to become an astronaut candidate to the NASA program, but fears she might not be accepted if they find out her beliefs. The second POV is that of Bob Kaganovski, flight mechanic, who is attracted to Valkerie until he learns that she is a Christian. He believes that she is there to take his place and begins to distrust her. And the third is that of Nate Harrington, Mars Mission Director, who knows that if the mission of finding life on Mars doesn’t succeed, the Mars program will lose its funding and will be shut down .

After months of training, the Ares 10 four-person crew of Kennedy, Lex, Bob, and Valkerie are ready to launch. Problems with the spacecraft arise following a shaky lift-off, but the astronauts choose to continue the mission. Valkerie has her doubts about continuing the mission, since Kennedy has been acting strangely.  Bob finds a mysterious cylinder that is not supposed to be on the craft. He accidentally sets off an explosion which injures the crew and damages the spacecraft leaving them with a limited oxygen supply.

Believing the origin of the explosion to be sabotage, the crew suspect each other rather than Nate or Josh. Josh, is their ex-crew member who stepped down for Valkerie to take his place. But none of them believe it could be Josh since he is their friend and their lifeline to NASA and home. A plan is formed which can save them, but can they trust each other and NASA?

During the journey, team members raise questions about God. Some members come to a greater understanding of His forgiveness and sacrificial love. I enjoyed seeing God use Valkerie’s gifts; He equipped her for the call He had on her life.

OXYGEN: A Science Fiction Suspense Novel (Book 1), was first printed in 2001 by Bethany House and in 2016 by Enclave Publishing and is available on Kindle. We are recommending it for our upper YA and college-age readers due to some intense scenes.

J. D. Rempel is a graduate of Simpson College. She is working on a middle grade novel and an adult fantasy series. She loves to read and started a library at her church. She enjoys working with her husband in youth ministry.

The Parable of the Lily by Liz Curtis Higgs, illustrated by Nancy Munger and published by Thomas Nelson Publishers (2007) is a picture book. On the surface it tells a simple story—a child’s rejection of a gift–but The Parable of the Lily  has a deep truth to share. The story may help your child connect on an emotional level with Jesus and the Easter story.

On a cold, snowy day a little girl receives a letter that a gift is being sent to her. Maggie eagerly waits for it. Finally, it arrives. But it surprises and disappoints her. How Maggie discovers the gift’s value and her response to her discovery is the rest of the story.

Bible verses on each page-spread link Maggie’s story with the story of Jesus and His resurrection. This simple story depicts the emotional responses of the people of the first century to the Father’s wonderful gift of Jesus. But the story does not just show the responses of people long ago. People today still reject God’s gift.

The watercolor and pencil illustrations are colorful and gently evocative. Important emotions and actions are vividly portrayed. Munger has also added sweet, humorous touches to her pages by depicting friendly animals that watch the actions of the main characters and sometimes even participate in the unfolding story.

Books 4 Christian Kids has other suggestions of Easter books that you might want to share with your little ones.

God Gave Us Easter
Easter Surprise
My Easter Basket: And the True Story of Easter
The Easter Story
An Easter Gift for Me

I also like the magnificently illustrated Exodus which tells the story of Passover. The drama of God’s deliverance of the Israelites will capture the imaginations of older children, and when they learn in Sunday school or from you that it is linked to the Easter story, I think their relationship with God will grow.

Nancy Ellen Hird is a mom, a writer and a credentialed teacher. (She taught seventh grade and preschool.) Two of her published works for children are Marty’s Monster and Jessica Jacobs Did What?  Her latest work is I Get a Clue, a mystery novel for girls 10-13. For several years she was a freelance reviewer of children’s and teen’s literature for the Focus on the Family website.

 

Sarah, Plain and Tall was written by Patricia MacLachlan. This  novel was the Newberry Medal winner thirty years ago and is still a sweet read. MacLachlan’s language is simple but eloquent. Though short, Sarah, Plain and Tall is rich in detail and heart. The genre is pioneer historical fiction and the book is suitable for elementary aged children.

The story is told from the point of view of pre-teen Anna, big sister to Caleb, whose mother died the day after Caleb was born. Their father, Jacob, manages the two of them and a farm on the prairie. They share the farm with two friendly dogs, two working horses, cows and sheep.

Jacob places an advertisement through the newspaper for a wife for himself and a mother for his children. He receives a reply from a woman in Maine named Sarah Wheaton. All three family members send letters in reply to Sarah’s letter.  The family and Sarah develop an interest in each other.

Sarah decides to come and visit them for a month, to see if they can get along together. She brings her cat and stays in a guest room in the house, because the town and adjoining farms are so far away.

The children desperately want her to stay. They want to hear her sing, as their mother did. They want their father to be happy again. Sarah misses the sea, though she makes every effort to embrace her new environment: plowing, cooking, and cutting hair. She meets the neighbors and survives a big storm. As they all learn about each other through the joys and trials of daily life on the farm, they must decide whether or not they can become a family.

In Sarah, Plain and Tall MacLachlan shows us ordinary people, living the ups and downs of ordinary life with grace. At 67 pages the novel is a nice-sized chapter book. It is available in most libraries, as well as on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Christianbook.com.

Donna Fujimoto’s children love to read. She is a graduate of Alliance Theological Seminary. Her collection of short stories, 9 Slightly Strange Stories with an Uplifting Edge  is available as an e-book at Amazon.  The Shining Orb of Volney, a science-fiction novel, is her latest title. 

 

The Love Letters written by Beverly Lewis and published by Bethany House Publishers (2015) is not your average love story. It is heartwarming in a way that will teach you some amazing lessons about how patient true love can be.

The plot centers around two main families, the Wengers and the Bitners. Marlena Wenger is in her early twenties. She has several siblings and recently her family has gone from Old Order Amish to Beachy Amish-Mennonite. Her mother asks her to go to a neighboring town for the summer to help her Mennonite grandmother, Janice Martin, whose beloved husband recently died. Marlena leaves behind her beau, Nat, and worries she will be lost without him.

The Bitners are her grandmother’s good friends and neighbors. They are Old Order Amish. They have three young daughters and a special-needs son, Jake (Small Jay), who will soon be a teen. Jake feels his father, Roman, has never understood him and won’t let him help much with the chores on their farm. Jake’s favorite friend is his cat, Sassafras, with whom he travels everywhere.

One day, Jake and his cat wander down by the mill and meet a man named Boston Calvert and his dog, Allegro. The man is middle-aged, seems intelligent and musical, plays a harmonica, but suffers from memory loss. Through a series of events, Boston comes to live with the Bitner family. He often asks Jake to read to him the letters Boston carries around in a leather satchel. The letters are love letters from an unknown lady named Abigail and addressed to my “Dearest Darling.” The other family members hear these letters and are delighted with their beauty.

Meanwhile, as Marlena settles in with Mammi Janice, she learns her sister Luella, has been in a serious car accident and is hospitalized. Luella had left her Amish family to marry an Englisher, Gordon. Marlena had tried to have a relationship with her sister, but they were never very close and she has not seen her for several years. Luella and her husband have a six-month old baby, Angela Rose. Gordon, who is in the military, is fighting overseas. Gordon’s aunt asks Marlena to care for the baby temporarily. Then Luella dies.

At first Marlena is stunned that she should be chosen for this task of caring for a baby and does not see how she will accomplish all the work on her grandma’s farm as well. Within a few short weeks, however, Marlena and Mammi have fallen in love with Angela Rose and can’t imagine life without her.

Jake is busy most days with his friend Boston who helps on the farm to earn his keep. Roman sees that his son is quite capable and takes more of an interest in him than he has in the past. In time, Boston remembers and the identity of the letter writer is revealed with happy results.

Letters also affect Marlena’s life. She and her beau Nat have been exchanging them. He asks her to stop attending the Mennonite Church and to find another place for her niece. Marlena is hurt and surprised that he would ask these things of her, especially seeing how much she is growing in her faith right where she is. She has also told the Lord she will serve Him in the ways He has led her, and doesn’t feel things should be any different. Will their relationship continue? What will happen to Marlena if it doesn’t?

In a nice plot twist a letter written by Luella to Gordon further  dramatically changes Marlena’s life.

The stories of the two families end happily. The new people who have come into their lives have changed them and blessed them. Marlena is especially thankful that the Lord opened her eyes to a closer walk with Him. He has granted her heart’s desires, along with giving her the knowledge that her sister, Luella, returned to her faith before she died and that they will be reunited one day.

Patsy Ledbetter says she has many titles, but her favorite is being mom to her five children. Her two daughters, two sons and one son-in-law are her joy. A teacher with forty years experience Patsy has taught children of all ages and also special needs children and adults. She writes occasionally for a local newspaper and performs in church theater productions on a regular basis. Her husband is the church choir and orchestra director. They have been married for 32 years. She says, “It is my desire to bring honor and glory to my Lord Jesus in every area where He has allowed me to minister.”

 

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