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A Grace Disguised written by Jerry Sittser and published by Zondervan; Enlarged edition (2004) is a small book about how the soul grows through loss. As Jerry writes, “The experience of loss does not have to be the defining moment in our lives. Instead, the defining moment can be our response to the loss. It is not what happens to us that matters so much as what happens in us.”

On the way home from a family trip to Idaho in 1991, Jerry’s vehicle was struck head on by a drunk driver. Three out of the seven people in the minivan were killed. Jerry had to frantically watch his mother, his wife, and his four-year-old daughter, Diana Jane, pass away. Three of his children survived. Catherine and David the two oldest recovered quickly, but John had serious injuries.

Jerry writes, “In the hours that followed the accident, the initial shock gave way to an unspeakable agony.” With candor, he tells us his crying lasted for about seventy days. However, the darkness of pain and loss did not end there, and he experienced grief in other ways.

And yet, he had to continue working and providing for his three surviving children. He was now a single father, completely responsible for his children’s physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. He was a teacher of theology at a Christian College, experiencing his own struggles. He asked the eternal question, “Why?” and desperately wanted his family members back. 

Jerry expresses his grief journey in a way that many people who have experienced loss can relate to. Eventually he says, after three years on his journey, he now feels that his soul has been enlarged to experience God’s grace in a much deeper way than before. His children have grown as well.

He says that facing the pain, and acceptance are key in order to profit from the loss. He accepts himself as a single man, serving His Lord to the best of his ability. He says that he and his children still continue to miss their family members each and every day, but much of the sting is gone, and he is finding enjoyment in the simplicity of living day to day.

The reality he describes can be understood by those who have lost a loved one or have experienced another type of catastrophic loss.  After recently losing my oldest son, this book helped me immensely. I believe there is a way to grieve and continue to trust entirely on the Lord’s mercy. He is our only hope and help in times of need. A Grace Disguised is very insightful and encouraging at a time when we are fragile. I would recommend it to readers eighteen years old and above. I hope you feel the comfort I did when I read this book.

Patsy Ledbetter has written poetry, short stories, devotionals, and book reviews for many years. She has also been a drama instructor, special needs teacher and substitute teacher. She and Kevin have been married for 41 years. They recently lost their oldest son Craig, age 33. They now have three children, Vanessa, Bethany and David. They also have three grandchildren, Elyse, Aurora, and Hayden. Kevin has been a music pastor most of his life and together they serve the Lord in a local church. Patsy loves to read, pray, and spend time outdoors and with family and friends. Her main desire is to bring glory to God through all the talents He has given her.

New Year’s Resolution: Spend time with the Someone who loves you. You know the one I mean. Spend time, set it aside, with God. He loves you more than anyone and loves you no matter what is going on in your life. (No matter what! You’re happy, sad, thoughtful, angry, excited. Share it all with Him, the Someone who loves you best.) And, point your kids to do the same.

I think using a devotional can be part of that experience. Reading and considering a devotion can get you thinking in a deeper way about God and His love for you. It can help you see an aspect of Him that you haven’t before. It can be a conversation starter between you and Him which can grow into something WONDERFUL–a richer life, a wiser direction.

For older teens, young women and adults we can commend: Adventures in Prayer, Praying with Jane, The Anne of Green Gables Devotional

We think you and your little ones will like: The Little Visits. . . series; Words to Dream: Bedtime Bible Stories and Prayers

For school age children we have read and liked Jesus Calling: 365 Devotions for Kids; Indescribable: 100 Devotions about God and Science

For teen girls we can suggest Adored: 365 Devotions for Young Women

For family devotions we think you and the family will be enriched with: Faith Forward Family Devotional; Grace for the Moment Family Devotional; Kingdom Family Devotional

The Anne of Green Gables Devotional by Rachel Dodge, artwork by Jana Christy, published by Barbour Books, (2020)

Sometimes people say, “Oh, but I fell in love with that book from the first sentence.” Well, I didn’t fall in love with the novel Anne of Green Gables from the first sentence or even the first pages.

Nosy, busy-body Mrs. Rachel Lynde going to “interrogate” steely Marilla Cuthbert about where Matthew Cuthbert was going—me, not interested. Not at all. There might be fireworks and at eleven years old, I didn’t want to be around to watch. Those women were scary.

I’m about to put the book down when shy, gentle, kind Matthew and talkative, plucky, imaginative Anne appear. From that moment on, I am theirs. And I don’t want to leave Green Gables or Avonlea. I become an invisible witness to Anne’s life, adventures, and misadventures. I even imagine that she and I are friends.

Rachel Dodge has taken this lovely, lovely book, Anne of Green Gables, that many of us read when we were younger and used its story elements to show adults and teens the face and heart of God. Following the story chronologically and looking into each chapter of the book, Rachel gives us in each devotion a quote from the novel’s chapter, a summary of the main action and then using that point as an illustration, reveals in a few paragraphs God’s activity in everyday life.

For example, in the chapter where Anne notices that she has been at Green Gables for a year, the author tells the reader that the room’s physical appearance is still the same, but the room is different. It now is filled with Anne, “a new, vital pulsing personality that seemed to pervade it.” Rachel then writes, “In the same way, you are no longer the same since you became a follower of Christ. The basic structure of your personality and being is there, but your soul and spirit have come to life. . .Your entire being is infused with the vivid presence of the Lord Jesus Christ.”

There are 39 devotions. As well as beginning and ending each devotion with a pertinent scripture, Rachel often refers to the stories of Biblical people such as Daniel, Esther, David, Ruth, and the healed Gadarene demoniac.

Each devotion also contains a few paragraphs on personal application. I found it refreshing that these personal applications often suggest first, ways you may grow in your relationship with God before suggesting that you serve others. For example, “. . .Wherever you are today—at home, at work or school, at the doctor’s office—that’s exactly where God wants you to be.  It may seem as though another life or another location would seem better or brighter, but God has purposes for you right here, right now.” And another I particularly liked: “As Christians, many of us still operate with an orphan mentality. When we’re in trouble, we forget to call for help. When we’re lost, we forget to stop and ask for directions. When we’re in pain, we forget to ask for comfort and encouragement. . .Start living like you belong to Jesus.”

The devotions, before ending with scripture, offer short prayers which can be personalized.

Many of the other devotionals that I’ve come in contact with, though instructive and useful, are more like chugging a glass of OJ, grabbing a piece of toast and you’re out the door. A devotion in The Anne of Green Gables Devotional is more like sitting down with God and eating His breakfast. Now don’t get the wrong impression, it is not a long, leisurely breakfast, but it is breakfast, and it will nourish you for the day like nutritionists say a good breakfast does.

Nancy Ellen Hird is a mom, a writer and a credentialed teacher. (She taught seventh grade and preschool.)  Her latest works for children are I Get a Clue and We All Get a Clue, mystery novels for girls 10-13.

Advent can be a crazy time for all of us, young and old and in-betweens. Especially in-betweens. We can forget what’s important. We can think we have to make Christmas happen. We forget that Christmas will come because He has come.

I suggest some down time to re-focus; read with the kids. And give yourself permission to not make a big event of it. (Hot chocolate is very optional and only if you really, really want to do it.) Just pick a book with a Christmas theme, settle on the couch and enjoy the story together. (If you don’t have kids, read to the kid in you.)

The Silent Noisy Night written by Jill Roman Lord, illustrated by Kelly Breemer and published by B&H Kids (2018), is a delight. This Christmas story wonders if it was all that silent on the night of Jesus’ birth. “It’s hard to stay so silent when we’ve heard the greatest news.”

Maybe the animals got excited and made animal noises. The shepherds certainly hollered. (She says townspeople in Bethlehem may have danced and sung. According to Luke, it’s not likely. They wondered at what the shepherds told them, but it doesn’t say they believed them and glorified God.) We do know that a host of angels couldn’t be silent and filled the night with their praises to God.

The Silent Noisy Night is a board book, so its target audience is young children, ages 2 to 4. I think five-year-olds will enjoy it as well and not be put off because it is a board book. The take-away message is beyond 2-year-olds, but don’t worry about it. These little ones will love the colorful, lively illustrations, the good rhyme, and if you make animal noises, etc. and invite the kids to join in, a fun time will be had by all. (In families with older children, they might even join in as well, albeit at first reluctantly.)

The books’ take-away message is a good one. “. . . we are not those horses, cows or birds. But we can celebrate our Lord with actions, songs, and words! Let’s spread the love of Jesus Christ and good news with delight! . . .”

Those of us at Books 4 Christian Kids have a few suggestions for some other delightful books.

God Gave Us Christmas

It’s a Wonderful Life for Kids!

The Legend of the Candy Cane

Lucille Nadine Alexander’s Birthday

A Night of Great Joy

Read and Play Christmas

Song of the Stars: A Christmas Story

Sparkle Box

For your young teen:

Jotham’s Journey

I get it that your older teen or college/person may not want to read aloud with you, but they still may need “a warm fuzzy” and some quiet moments away from all the excitement of the season. May we suggest for the young women in your world:

A Christmas Gift for Rose 

Engaging Father Christmas

Finding Father Christmas

21 Days of Christmas

Tell me how it goes. (I understand completely if you want to wait until January to do this.) And if you do decide to make hot chocolate, I want the recipe. 🙂

Nancy Ellen Hird is a mom, a writer and a credentialed teacher. (She taught seventh grade and preschool.)  Her latest works for children are I Get a Clue and We All Get a Clue, mystery novels for girls 10-13.

The Undoing of Saint Silvanus is Beth Moore’s first novel. It was published in 2017 by Tyndale House Publishers. Beth Moore is a very well-known writer of Bible studies and nonfiction books. She does an excellent job in this fascinating story. 

Most of the characters in this novel do not come to a place of faith in their lives until close to the end. There is some mystery and vengeance that is played out, and therefore, a reader audience of those above eighteen is best. 

Jillian Slater of San Francisco is the only daughter born to Jacyln (Jade) Slater and Rafael Weyland Fontaine. When she was six, she and her mother left New Orleans for California. That was twenty years ago, and she and her mother have not seen her father since. Jillian hears that he has recently drunk himself to death on the streets of New Orleans.

Adella Atwater, the manager of her grandmother’s apartment house contacts Jillian with an expenses paid invitation for her to fly there for her father’s burial. Jillian works at an upscale restaurant and is living with the owner, Vince. She has a few vacation days coming up. She decides to go on the trip. Though her father has passed away, she has a chance to reconnect with her grandmother, Olivia Fontaine. 

Once Jillian arrives in New Orleans, she finds out her grandmother never knew she was coming. The entire plan was contrived by Adella to try and connect the two. Jillian agrees to stay a week in the old apartment building, which is actually a very old church, Saint Silvanus.

The church dates back to 1918 and has a painful history. During the story, there are several flashback chapters describing the church and the pastor, Reverend R. J. Brasher.

Some interesting people live in the apartment building. Jillian meets them and finds them endearing. Middle-aged David is a junior high school choir director. Young Caryn is studying science. Mrs Winsee is a sweet, elderly woman who has mild dementia. Jillian’s grandmother, Olivia Fontaine, has a heart of gold buried beneath a cold exterior. Jillian also meets Adella’s family, her husband Emmett and grown sons, A. J. and Trevor Don.

The police begin to investigate her father’s death. Officer Sanchez and Officer Cal DeCosta also look into strange notes and items left at night on the Fontaine property.

After a week, Jillian and Olivia argue and Jillian, feeling unwanted, flies back to San Francisco. There, she discovers that her live-in boyfriend, Vince has taken up with another waitress.  Humiliated, Jillian flies back to New Orleans with only a purse and the clothes on her back. Olivia offers to help her, but Jillian wants to find her own place and support herself. All of the residents want her there, but she leaves anyway, gets a job, and stays with Stella, a woman she barely knows. Stella offers her a place in her apartment which is close to Jillian’s work.

At this point, the story becomes a mini thriller. Stella has ulterior motives. She wants to destroy Jillian and the Fontaine family name and fortune, 

Eventually, everything gets sorted out. Officer Sanchez and Adella play a role in witnessing to the others of Christ’s love and forgiveness. The main characters turn their hearts and lives over to Christ. All is well.

The Undoing of Saint Silvanus is a very long book, over 400 pages, and it kept my interest the entire time. I know you will find it as interesting as I did.  It is heartwarming, and points to Jesus as our one and only Savior.

Patsy Ledbetter says she has many titles, but her favorite is being mom to her six children. Her two daughters, two sons and one son-in-law and one-daughter-in-law are her joy. A teacher with forty years experience Patsy has taught children of all ages and also special needs children and adults. She writes occasionally for a local newspaper and performs in church theater productions on a regular basis. She and her husband have been married for more than 35 years. She says, “It is my desire to bring honor and glory to my Lord Jesus in every area where He has allowed me to minister.”

Dear Book Lovers,

I majored in English. I trained as a teacher and I taught school. I don’t just believe that good reading skills are valuable. I know it. Children in my classes who did not read well, often struggled in other subjects. They often had self-esteem problems and difficulties socializing with other kids. So, I somewhat get it when some parents say about popular but questionable books, “At least the children are reading.”

However, no one would say, in response to kids chowing down humongous doses of sugars and fats in the form of junk foods, “At least they are eating.” People wouldn’t say that. Everyone knows that if children are to be healthy, they must eat food that nourishes their bodies.

Well, what kids read is food for their minds and their souls. They cannot consistently read materials that contradict God and His word and not become sick—soul sick.

“…whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent and praiseworthy—think about such things.” Philippians 4:8 (NIV)

Bravo to you parents, grandparents, friends, teachers, and librarians who make the time to learn about kids’ books and encourage the kids in your life to “eat” the good ones.

We have some suggestions for you and your beloved young friends:  Book Lists.

Nancy Ellen Hird is a mom, a writer and a credentialed teacher. (She taught seventh grade and preschool.) You can learn more about her and her books at www.nancyellenhird.com .

For several years she was a freelance reviewer of children’s and teen’s literature for the Focus on the Family website.

Hearts of Fire, written by those involved in the ministry The Voice of the Martyrs, and published by The Voice of the Martyrs Books (2015), is the story of eight women in the underground church and their stories of costly faith. There is a foreword by Gracia Burnham.

This book will definitely keep you up at night. It is a compelling read. I was captivated with the stories of women who offered every aspect of their lives to the Lord. The women experienced much persecution, but also a large amount of joy in the Lord.

Their stories are absolutely amazing. Most of the women are young when they surrender their lives to Jesus. Each story is about a woman from a different country. Many of these women are beaten by fathers and brothers when it is discovered that they are Christians. Many are imprisoned for their faith and forced to live in deplorable conditions. One woman and her husband are arrested, leaving their twelve-year-old son to be cared for by others.

Even though, their faith in Jesus costs them everything, these women are still passionate about sharing their faith with others. Nothing can stop them. Some of them are freed only after years in prison.

One story of Sabina and Richard Wurmbrand, and their son Mihai, is particularly compelling. After many years in prison for their faith, the other believers in the underground church convinced them to go to the United States so they could be a voice for their brothers and sisters who were being persecuted.

“In October 1967, with only one hundred dollars and an old typewriter that sat on their kitchen table, the Wurmbrands wrote the first issue of The Voice of the Martyrs newsletter. Since then, the newsletter has continued to be published monthly, and distributed through VOM offices around the world in multiple languages.”  This couple tirelessly shared a message of hope and love in the face of persecution.

Each woman in these amazing stories found their lives enriched through their costly faith and the trials they suffered. Hearts of Fire certainly convicted me.

I often think I am being persecuted, but in actuality, I am only experiencing some discomfort. It is not to be compared with the things these women went through. We all have our problems, and God has ordained each one for His purpose to grow us closer to Him. He knows all about each of us, and is always delighted when we draw near to Him. I believe this story will strengthen your faith and motivate you to rejoice in your own trials, as you discover His purpose in your life. I would recommend this book for readers eighteen and above.

Patsy Ledbetter says she has many titles, but her favorite is being mom to her six children. Her two daughters, two sons and one son-in-law and one-daughter-in-law are her joy. A teacher with forty years experience Patsy has taught children of all ages and also special needs children and adults. She writes occasionally for a local newspaper and performs in church theater productions on a regular basis. She and her husband have been married for more than 35 years. She says, “It is my desire to bring honor and glory to my Lord Jesus in every area where He has allowed me to minister.”

An Appalachian Summer by Ann H. Gabhart and published by Revell (2020) is cute, informative and fun. This would be a great read for women 16 and above.

It takes place in Kentucky in 1933. As the country still reels from the Great Depression, Erwin and Wanda Mae’s daughter, Piper Danson, age twenty, is about to make her debut with a lavish debutante ball in Louisville. The only problem is that she doesn’t want to be there.

She is a simple young lady, preferring to be outdoors riding her horse and spending time with her lifelong friend, Jamie Russell. During the depression, Jamie’s father lost his fortune and passed away. Jamie and his mother are now living with his Uncle Wyatt in Danville, Kentucky.

Piper’s escort to the ball is Braxton Crandall, of the Crandall Railroad fortune. He is her parent’s perfect choice of a suitor. Piper is disinterested and barely knows him. She wants to eventually marry, but only for love. Jamie fits the bill, but now with his family situation, her parents would not agree to a match between the two.

Piper’s Aunt Truda, her father’s sister, works at his bank and is an accomplished accountant. At forty-five, she is unmarried. Some years ago, she met a young medical student and was quite taken with him. Jack Booker was also enthralled with Truda during the short time he spent with her. But when he sent her a letter, her parents confiscated it and never let her know he had written. She found this out much later, and although disappointed, accepted it as God’s will for her life. She is content.

Aunt Truda hosts a fundraising tea for her friend, Mary Breckenridge, who has begun a Frontier Nurse Midwives Ministry in Hyden, Kentucky. Hyden is located in the Appalachian Mountains where mothers are not able to travel to hospitals to give birth. The midwives and helpers proceed up the mountains on horseback to help deliver babies and treat those in need of medical attention.

Piper and her mother attend the fundraising event. Piper is taken with the idea of becoming part of this ministry for the summer. Aunt Truda offers to sponsor her in the endeavor. Piper’s mother is not at all in favor of Piper’s participation. She would much rather see Piper attend the balls of the social season and end with getting engaged to Braxton Crandall. Piper disagrees and can’t escape the social events soon enough. She is young and ready for an adventure. She desires to spend her summer doing something she has never done before and learning new skills that can help others.

Piper is a churchgoer, but in the mountain country of Kentucky her faith becomes much more real. She meets new people and befriends the other couriers, Marlie and Susan. Piper learns how to care for the horses, and even accompanies the nurses on their mountain visits. She helps deliver several babies and she works at the Hyden Hospital.

While at the hospital, she runs into Dr. Jack Booker, the man who had impressed her aunt twenty years ago. Piper just happens to mention this in a letter to her aunt. Truda is overwhelmed with excitement at the thought of visiting Hyden and running into Jack once again.

Truda, Jamie and Braxton Crandall all eventually end up in Hyden, Kentucky. Each with their own agenda. Fun, crazy times are in store for all. You will laugh at the episodes that follow.

The story ends on a happy note, with several characters finding love, joy and peace. Eventually, all of the characters seek the Lord’s purpose in their lives. They find great joy and value in helping others. They make friends with the amazing Appalachian people who have much to teach.

This was a fun novel. Characters grow, and those in need are helped. Many of the shenanigans are hilarious. It is my hope you will enjoy An Appalachian Summer as much as I did.

 

Patsy Ledbetter says she has many titles, but her favorite is being mom to her six children. Her two daughters, two sons and one son-in-law and one-daughter-in-law are her joy. A teacher with forty years experience Patsy has taught children of all ages and also special needs children and adults. She writes occasionally for a local newspaper and performs in church theater productions on a regular basis. She and her husband have been married for more than 35 years. She says, “It is my desire to bring honor and glory to my Lord Jesus in every area where He has allowed me to minister.”

 

The Book of Lost Friends, by one of my favorite authors, Lisa Wingate, published by Ballantine Books (2020), is guaranteed to enlighten you. You will love Lisa’s descriptive writing and character sculpting. This story is fictional, yet it is based on stories from actual “Lost Friends” advertisements that appeared in Southern newspapers after the Civil War, as newly freed slaves searched for loved ones who had been sold.

It takes place in Augustine, Louisiana, in 1875. After the war, three young women set off for Texas on a dangerous journey. Hannie is a freed slave, along with Lavinia, the heir of the plantation where Hannie lived and worked, and Juneau Jane, Lavinia’s Creole half-sister. Lavinia and Juneau Jane are searching for their father, William Gossett. They are hoping to receive their inheritance. Eighteen-year-old Hannie, is seeking the family she lost years ago.

This story also includes a separate tale of Benedetta Silva, who in 1987, comes to the same area in Augustine, Louisiana, where the Gossett Plantation remains. She ends up renting one of the cottages at Gossett Grove, now under the ownership of Nathan Gossett. She is a first-year teacher with a subsidized job at a poor rural school. She is seeking to pay off her student loan debt, but quickly becomes immersed in the lives of her poverty-stricken high school students. Her favorite, LaJuna, has a difficult home life and challenges to overcome, yet LaJuna turns out to be her most promising student.

Hannie has a degree of faith in God which grows as the story unfolds. Hannie’s family, her mother Mittie and eight siblings, along with other relatives, lived with William and Maude Loach Gossett of Gossett Grove.

At one point, everyone takes a trip to Texas along with Maude’s nephew, Jep Loach, who steals Hannie and her entire family and sells them two at a time along the way. He is the villain in this story. He is not able to sell Hannie, the last one, because it is discovered that she has been stolen. An angry William Gossett is summoned and comes to her aid, taking her back to his plantation. At the same time he is married to Maude, William takes a second wife in another area of Louisiana, and fathers Juneau Jane La Planche and her brother. Eventually Maude discovers this and is very unhappy.

Meanwhile in 1987, Benedetta, or Bennie, is digging into the history of the Gossett family. She and her students, especially LaJuna are working on a project to portray many of the characters from the past, and make their stories come to life. Bennie become friends with Nathan Gossett, a descendant of William Gossett.

Many adventures and close calls follow Hannie and her friends as they travel from place to place. She encounters advertisements, a column in the newspaper, the Southwestern Christian Advocate Newspaper. Freed slaves are looking for their lost relatives–those separated from them by slavery and war. Other people tell her they are also looking for their loved ones and hoping to reunite with them They give her their information and names of family members. She promises to ask after these people as they travel. She begins the biggest project of her life, a compilation of this information. She names it The Book of Lost Friends.

“Having found many members of my [own] family” Hannie remarked, “This was an impassioned service I could provide for others. The greatest hardship to the heart is to endlessly wonder about your people.”

When Bennie’s students finally perform their program to represent characters from the past who did not have a voice of their own, it is LaJuna who portrays Hannie Gossett. She also comes to discover that Hannie was her great-grandmother.

The story ends happily. The main characters feel a sense of accomplishment. Joy comes as they realize they have helped others and told stories that may not have been otherwise known.

I really enjoyed this read. It was told by a master storyteller. My hope is that you will enjoy it as well. God is good. He loves us and is delighted when we used our gifts in the way He intended, blessing others as a result.

 

Patsy Ledbetter says she has many titles, but her favorite is being mom to her six children. Her two daughters, two sons and one son-in-law and one-daughter-in-law are her joy. A teacher with forty years experience Patsy has taught children of all ages and also special needs children and adults. She writes occasionally for a local newspaper and performs in church theater productions on a regular basis. She and her husband have been married for more than 35 years. She says, “It is my desire to bring honor and glory to my Lord Jesus in every area where He has allowed me to minister.”

 

 

 

 

OK, they or events–you decide–cancelled summer this year. Or did they? We can still go camping or have picnics (if only in our backyards), sip lemonade, ride bikes and daydream summer dreams. Summer fun and adventures are still open.

You and the kids can still go places. Think of it. You can go to Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. Or visit Prince Edward Island with Anne Shirley in Anne of Green Gables. Or if you dare, what about going to Ireland in the days of the Vikings, Raiders from the Sea? You could choose your own sea adventure: Journey under the Sea or you could visit a small town in the woods of California’s  Sierra Nevada: The City Bear’s Adventures. How about solving mysteries in Botswana?  The Great Cake Mystery is the first one in that series for young readers. Or if you want a cooler climate you can help solve mysteries with Libby and her friends in Edinburgh, Scotland: I Get a Clue and We All Get a Clue. (Get your umbrellas out of the closet and keep them handy. It rains in Scotland even in the summer. :))

Those are just a few suggestions. We have others. Here’s some more. (Titles are linked to our reviews.) Let the adventures begin!

The Avion My Uncle Flew
Chancey of Maury River
Cheaper by the Dozen
Escape from Warsaw
Hidden Figures Young Readers’ Edition
Horse to Love, A
In Grandma’s Attic
The Incredible Journey
Jungle Doctor Meets a Lion
Little Lord Fauntleroy

McKenna
Meet Josephina
Meet Kaya
Mustang, Wild Spirit of the West 
Nick Newton Is Not a Genius 
Pollyanna
Running with Roselle
Sarah, Plain and Tall
Scout
Secret Garden, The
The Tarantula in My Purse and 172 Other Wild Pets
The Trumpet of the Swan

The Wolves of Willoughby Chase

And while you are at it, maybe you would like an adventure–that is, after the kids are in bed. (Or maybe you could read your book sitting next to them while they are reading theirs. It’s a good thing for them to see you reading–so say some studies.) Take a look at the list for College Age/Working Person under Book Lists. Ah, an adventure in England! Ah, the American West! Hawaii, anyone?

Nancy Ellen Hird is a mom, a writer and a credentialed teacher. (She taught seventh grade and preschool.) You can learn more about her and her books at www.nancyellenhird.com .

For several years she was a freelance reviewer of children’s and teen’s literature for the Focus on the Family website.

 

Book Reviews

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